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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> let me finish with a behind the scenes look at what really happened at the great kennedy/nixon debates. you will love these stories i have dug up. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> roun brown's in the national journal wrote the main reason oen is doing better in battleground zats has to do with his increase from white working women. keep in mind, back in 2008 nationally obama only got 41% of that group's vote. well, today in michigan 46% say they support the president. in florida it's 48%. nevada, new hampshire, wisconsin, and pennsylvania, hovers around 50%. in ohio and iowa, it's up to 52%. lo
-deportation for illegal immigrants. >>> let me fin wish a behind the scene looks in what happened in the great kennedy/nixon debates. i've got it for you. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and every day since, we've worked hard to keep it. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with governments and across the industry so we can all produce energy more safely. i want you to know, there's another commitment bp takes just as seriously: our commitment to america. bp supports nearly two-hundred-fifty thousand jobs in communities across the country. we hired three thousand people just last year. bp invests more in america than in any other country. in fact, over the last five years, no other energy company has invested more in the us than bp. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. today, our commitment to the gulf, and to america, has never been st
the scene looks in what happened in the great kennedy/nixon debates. i've got it for you. this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> ron brown's in "the national journal" wrote, the main reason obama is doing better in battleground states has to do with his increase from white working women. working class women. keep in mind, back in 2008, nationally, obama only got 41% of that group's vote. well, today in michigan 46% say they support the president. in florida it's 48%. nevada, new hampshire, wisconsin, and pennsylvania, the number hovers in those cases around 50%. in ohio and iowa, it's up to 52%. looking good for the president with white working class women. what an interesting category to be moving ahead in. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." today we saw a blow to the nationwide republican effort to suppress democratic turnout. a pennsylvania judge blocked a strict voter photo i.d. requirement from going into effect before election day. judge robert simpson wrote in part, i am not still -- i am not still convinced that there will be no voter disenfranchisement ar
with john f. kennedy facing vice-president nixon. the next debates were not until 1976. a commission was set up to run the debates. at town hall format was introduced in 1992, which will be the format for the second debate. -- a town hall format was introduced in 1992. that will take place october 16. the final debate returns to the moderator and candidates on october 22 at lynn university of florida. on the panel today to discuss going beyond winning and losing, and we will move from my immediate left, correspondent of the new york times, abc news and nbc news and participant in the first televised debate in 1960 in chicago. and the grower, washington post contributing writer. ndy grower " washington post" contributing writer. michael hogan. charles mack gokalain. catherine olsen, univ. of wisconsin milwaukee and director of the schools frederick program. thank you all for being with us today. we will begin the program today with a bit of advice for those of you here in the studio and those of you watching for following this on twitter. when we go to questions, there are two microphones and
to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney bbecause there s an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the government -- as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak such -- to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 -- 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is that a really
presidential campaigns since 1968. and humphrey and nixon. so i've been watching debates throughout the years, and it's my super bowl. i mean, i get all excited. i'm so thrilled that the debate is tomorrow, i can hardly wait. so i have observed many of the debates, not just based on my experience, but there is always something, people, after i did the debate, would come and tell me that they were concerned about things that the candidates did. >> like what? >> not what they said. >> like looking at a watch? >> like george bush looking at his watch, and standing near his stool the entire debate. and bill clinton wading right up to the audience questioners showing his compassion and feeling for these people. and it jumped through the screen. and i've had people -- i've had people, you know, these days, telling me, i want to see how they do. it is not -- i want it hear what they have to say about how to solve the economy. they want to see how they do. and i think a lot of things -- the conventional wisdom is that all the debates do is reinforce your ideas about a candidate that you support, or d
the first kennedy/nixon debate where kennedy defied the expectations that he was a rich light weight playboy and won the debate as much as nixon lost it. in 1980 reagan defies expectations because people -- there was a character that the carter campaign created of him of a nuclear cowboy. it is none of those things. >> carter also was asking about nuclear war. >> what romney has to do is forget the nonsense about it being about himself. if you are a 65-year-old man you are not comfortable in your own skin you never will be. he has to talk to the american people. he has to have a conversation with the american people and get them to see him as a president. >> has he? >> no he has not. >> why not? >> his convention speech he has run a personality campaign and nobody is going to out personality barack obama. >> for romney to just breakthrough what looks like an increasing race in which he has fewer chances to change the dynamics. obama has to just not make it and he wins. this is a tough situation for a challenger particularly on the first debate. the pressure is on domestic policy. and so this
-aways as an issue, that goes back to kennedy and nixon. we've been talking about this part of reaction shots over 50 years. candidates still haven't mastered the thought you have to think about what you're looking like when you don't speak. bill clinton was one who actually used to practice his facial expressions for when he wasn't talking. i think most candidates would poo-poo that idea, but i think there is value in it. >> there is spin room for both sides, but the spin is going to be happening in the moment through social media, through twitter, through facebook. do you think that is a huge development because one false move can be global in a matter of seconds and trending on twitter? >> absolutely. you're on to something with that theory. i think twitter becomes the new spin room. the difference is that the spin room is spinning during the debate, not necessarily after. also, always before the spinning was handed down from the top down, and now you've got everybody in the country with the ability to weigh in and have an opinion as the debate is happening. i see a shift in a couple of ways. not
and debates have not been so decisive except when the races are very already tight, kennedy/nixon, gore/bush, but we may well see the narrative of a 1% romney which we've seen reinforcing the 47%. video and that -- and out of touch with not only his own being who he was, but with ordinary voters, average people in this country. >> i'm -- i'm eager to see how romney deals with follow-up questions. ryan's stuff the contention i don't have enough time, what i'm trying to basically tear apart the american social compact, you know, in some -- if you interpret it in one way but massively overhaul this nation's sort of tax plan, but i don't have time to get into the details, president obama's going to press him on this. >> well, right. well, one, you a situation where, you know, mitt romney apparently has all these memorized zingers that he's going to unleash on the president tomorrow, but then, what you don't hear folks talk about is, once the zinger has been thrown out there, then what? so he lays out and says energy independence, well when the follow-up question comes, what's the there ther
on american soil. that's been around forever. preobama prereagan pre-nixon that's gone back to the '20s. >> stephanie: we have to break. 46 minutes after the hour. right-wing world is next. we continue hutch days with hal on "the stephanie miller show." >> damn it jim i'm not a doctor but i think i'm dying of laughter. it is "the stephanie miller show." in romney's world, cars get the elevator and the workers get the shaft. that is a whole bunch of bunk. the powerful may steal an election, but they can't steal democracy. (vo) jennifer granholm ... >>for every discouraged voter, there are ten angry ones taking action. trickle down does not work. in romney's world, cars get the elevator and the workers get the shaft. that is a whole bunch of bunk. the powerful may steal an election, but they can't steal democracy. (vo) always outspoken, now unleashed. joy behar. >> on my next show, actress, activist, and flyest of the fly girls, rosie perez, generates so much heat, al gore will have to look into it. [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> announcer: stephanie miller. ♪ daisy d
probably running out of time. i will say that on the optimism front, can anyone imagine during the kennedy-nixon debates that we would all be watching it with twitter, that there would be fact checking, that there would be conversations going on? hearing him on the radio, he sounds a lot better. or anything like that. i think this is a great time for political coverage, and i hope that that turns out to be true in the next few weeks and that we do not instead see some degraded moments of politics, but i think it is going to be fascinating. >> thank you. do you want to pick up? anna? >> i am, again, anna sale, and i think what is most prominent is what we think about is who is winning, and thirdly, where is the race taking place, and that is what we are looking at, swing states, and that is where a lot of my reporting has been at over the last six months. we are clearly -- radio. voter voices is a big driver of how we want to cover the election, so we started a series this summer called "that is my issue," and with that, we are hearing what the candidates are focusing on, trying to get people to
political era for getting people like joe mccarthy and richard nixon. talk about the media establishment's view of eisenhower. >> the media establishment basically loved eisenhower. he was their friend. you read his private correspondence. he and the publisher of "time" were great buddies. a lot of time people working in the white house -- it was such a different age. it was not as adversarial. it was much more trusting. correspondents would come out over to the white house, have a few drinks a s with ike. he'd say stuff off the record. he even talked about recognizing china. imagine if that had leaked during the 1950s. it was just a different era. and ike was trustworthy. reporters also trusted him. >> also talk about ike the republican president that was willing to send troops to little rock. >> you know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegregated the armed services. it wasn't truman. he appointed all the federa
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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